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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 179796, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/179796
Research Article

Alteration of Behavioral Changes and Hippocampus Galanin Expression in Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress-Induced Depression Rats and Effect of Electroacupuncture Treatment

1School of Acupuncture, Moxibustion and Tuina, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, No. 11 North Third Ring Road East, Chaoyang, Beijing 100029, China
2Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Inner Mongolia People’s Hospital, No. 20 Zhao Wuda Road, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region 010017, China
3Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Rehabilitation, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, No. 88 Jiefang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310009, China

Received 4 June 2014; Revised 15 September 2014; Accepted 17 September 2014; Published 30 October 2014

Academic Editor: Haruki Yamada

Copyright © 2014 Yuping Mo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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