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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 191347, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/191347
Review Article

Current Studies of Acupuncture in Cancer-Induced Bone Pain Animal Models

Department of Acupuncture & Moxibustion, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, 149 Sangil-dong, Gangdong-gu, Seoul 134-727, Republic of Korea

Received 18 June 2014; Revised 22 August 2014; Accepted 28 August 2014; Published 14 October 2014

Academic Editor: Lixing Lao

Copyright © 2014 Hee Kyoung Ryu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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