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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 203173, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/203173
Research Article

Effect of Yoga on Pain, Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, and Serotonin in Premenopausal Women with Chronic Low Back Pain

1Graduate School of Alternative Medicine, Kyonggi University, 24 Kyonggidae-ro 9-gil, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-702, Republic of Korea
2Division of General Studies, Seoil University, Yongmasan-ro 90-gil, Jungnang-gu, Seoul 131-702, Republic of Korea

Received 28 February 2014; Revised 24 June 2014; Accepted 26 June 2014; Published 10 July 2014

Academic Editor: Ke Ren

Copyright © 2014 Moseon Lee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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