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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 287631, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/287631
Research Article

Differential Effects of Naja naja atra Venom on Immune Activity

1Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Translational Research and Therapy for Neuro-Psycho-Diseases (BM2013003), Department of Pharmacology and Laboratory of Aging and Nervous Diseases, Soochow University School of Pharmaceutical Science, Suzhou 215123, China
2The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006, China

Received 23 January 2014; Revised 15 May 2014; Accepted 21 May 2014; Published 12 June 2014

Academic Editor: Ching-Liang Hsieh

Copyright © 2014 Jian-Qun Kou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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