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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 319436, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/319436
Research Article

Cognitive-Enhancing Effect of Steamed and Fermented Codonopsis lanceolata: A Behavioral and Biochemical Study

1Department of Medical Biomaterials Engineering, College of Biomedical Science, Kangwon National University, Hyoja-2 Dong, Chuncheon 200-701, Republic of Korea
2Laboratory of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Pharmacy, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701, Republic of Korea
3Department of Teaics, Seowon University, Cheongju 361-742, Republic of Korea
4Functional Food & Nutrition Division, Department of Agrofood Resources, Rural Development Administration, Suwon 441-853, Republic of Korea
5Newtree Co., Ltd., 11F Tech Center, SKnTechno Park 190-1, Sungnam 462-120, Republic of Korea
6Research Institute of Biotechnology, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701, Republic of Korea

Received 1 May 2014; Revised 26 May 2014; Accepted 27 May 2014; Published 16 June 2014

Academic Editor: Mohammad Amjad Kamal

Copyright © 2014 Jin Bae Weon et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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