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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 418206, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/418206
Review Article

Traditional Chinese Medicine Syndromes for Essential Hypertension: A Literature Analysis of 13,272 Patients

Department of Cardiology, Guang’anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100053, China

Received 29 October 2013; Accepted 19 December 2013; Published 10 February 2014

Academic Editor: Bo Feng

Copyright © 2014 Jie Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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