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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 485043, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/485043
Research Article

Electroacupuncture Reduces Hyperalgesia after Injections of Acidic Saline in Rats

1Graduate Program in Health Science, Federal University of Sergipe, Aracaju, SE, Brazil
2Graduate Program in Physiological Science, Federal University of Sergipe, Aracaju, SE, Brazil
3Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of Sergipe, Aracaju, SE, Brazil
4Department of Physiology, Federal University of Sergipe, Aracaju, SE, Brazil

Received 10 September 2013; Revised 27 January 2014; Accepted 6 February 2014; Published 19 March 2014

Academic Editor: Cun-Zhi Liu

Copyright © 2014 Leonardo Yung dos Santos Maciel et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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