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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 495274, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/495274
Research Article

Effects of Qigong Training on Health-Related Quality of Life, Functioning, and Cancer-Related Symptoms in Survivors of Nasopharyngeal Cancer: A Pilot Study

1Institute of Human Performance, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong
2Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong
3The Association of Licentiates of the Medical Council of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
4Department of Health and Physical Education, Hong Kong Institute of Education, Tai Po, Hong Kong
5School of Nursing, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong

Received 30 April 2014; Accepted 14 May 2014; Published 28 May 2014

Academic Editor: Manuel Arroyo-Morales

Copyright © 2014 Shirley S. M. Fong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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