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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 562804, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/562804
Research Article

Synergetic Antimicrobial Effects of Mixtures of Ethiopian Honeys and Ginger Powder Extracts on Standard and Resistant Clinical Bacteria Isolates

1Department of Biotechnology, Natural and Computational Sciences Faculty, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia
2Department of Parasitology, School of Biomedical and Laboratory Sciences, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, P.O. Box 196, Gondar, Ethiopia

Received 26 November 2013; Revised 3 February 2014; Accepted 10 February 2014; Published 17 March 2014

Academic Editor: Sunil Kumar Khare

Copyright © 2014 Yalemwork Ewnetu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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