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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 730678, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/730678
Research Article

Extracts from Curcuma zedoaria Inhibit Proliferation of Human Breast Cancer Cell MDA-MB-231 In Vitro

1The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310006, China
2Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Zhejiang 310022, China

Received 14 February 2014; Revised 3 April 2014; Accepted 7 April 2014; Published 5 May 2014

Academic Editor: Lourdes Díaz-Rodríguez

Copyright © 2014 Xiu-fei Gao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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