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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 828760, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/828760
Research Article

Inhibitory Effect on β-Hexosaminidase Release from RBL-2H3 Cells of Extracts and Some Pure Constituents of Benchalokawichian, a Thai Herbal Remedy, Used for Allergic Disorders

1Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University, Rangsit Campus, Khlong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120, Thailand
2Department of Applied Thai Traditional Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University, Rangsit Campus, Khlong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120, Thailand
3Center of Excellence on Applied Thai Traditional Medicine Research (CEATMR), Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University, Rangsit Campus, Khlong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120, Thailand

Received 3 November 2014; Revised 20 November 2014; Accepted 22 November 2014; Published 16 December 2014

Academic Editor: Il-Moo Chang

Copyright © 2014 Thana Juckmeta et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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