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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 873607, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/873607
Research Article

Evaluation of the Antihyperuricemic Activity of Phytochemicals from Davallia formosana by Enzyme Assay and Hyperuricemic Mice Model

1School of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan
2Graduate Institute of Pharmacognosy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan
3Graduate Institute of Sports Science, National Taiwan Sport University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan
4National Research Institute of Chinese Medicine, Taipei 112, Taiwan
5Graduate Institute of Athletics and Coaching Science, National Taiwan Sport University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan

Received 22 December 2013; Revised 10 March 2014; Accepted 13 March 2014; Published 4 May 2014

Academic Editor: Wen Chuan Lin

Copyright © 2014 Chen-Yu Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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