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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 902516, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/902516
Research Article

Xiao Yao San Improves Depressive-Like Behavior in Rats through Modulation of β-Arrestin 2-Mediated Pathways in Hippocampus

1Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, No. 1838, Guangzhou 510515, China
2The Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology, State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515, China
3Dean’s Office, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510282, China
4Hygiene Detection Center, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China
5Traditional Chinese Medicine Integrated Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510305, China

Received 25 March 2014; Revised 26 May 2014; Accepted 4 June 2014; Published 7 July 2014

Academic Editor: Karl Wah-Keung Tsim

Copyright © 2014 Xiaoxia Zhu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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