Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 965045, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/965045
Research Article

The Effect of the Kampo Medicine Yokukansan on Preoperative Anxiety and Sedation Levels

1Department of Surgery, Toki General Hospital, Gifu 509-5193, Japan
2Multidisciplinary Pain Centre, School of Medicine, Aichi Medical University, 21 Karimata, Nagakutecho, Aichigun, Aichi 480-1195, Japan

Received 2 January 2014; Accepted 3 March 2014; Published 31 March 2014

Academic Editor: Kenji Watanabe

Copyright © 2014 Young-Chang Arai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. J. K. Carroll, E. Cullinan, L. Clarke, and N. F. Davis, “The role of anxiolytic premedication in reducing preoperative anxiety,” British Journal of Nursing, vol. 21, no. 8, pp. 479–483, 2012. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. F. V. Nelson, L. Zimmerman, S. Barnason, J. Nieveen, and M. Schmaderer, “The relationship and influence of anxiety on postoperative pain in the coronary artery bypass graft patient,” Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 102–109, 1998. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. F. Fekrat, A. Sahin, K. M. Yazici, and U. Aypar, “Anaesthetists' and surgeons' estimation of preoperative anxiety by patients submitted for elective surgery in a university hospital,” European Journal of Anaesthesiology, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 227–233, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. K. J. Walker and A. F. Smith, “Premedication for anxiety in adult day surgery,” Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, no. 4, Article ID CD002192, 2009. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. P. F. White, B. Tufanogullari, J. Taylor, and K. Klein, “The effect of pregabalin on preoperative anxiety and sedation levels: a dose-ranging study,” Anesthesia and Analgesia, vol. 108, no. 4, pp. 1140–1145, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. E. C. Moschik, C. Mercado, T. Yoshino, K. Matsuura, and K. Watanabe, “Usage and attitudes of physicians in Japan concerning traditional Japanese medicine (Kampo Medicine): a descriptive evaluation of a representative questionnaire-based survey,” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 2012, Article ID 139818, 13 pages, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. Y. C. Arai, M. Nishihara, S. Inoue, and I. Makino, “Kampo diagnostic procedure, Fuku shin, could be a useful diagnostic tool for psychopathological patients suffering from chronic pain,” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 2013, Article ID 816216, 4 pages, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  8. T. Yamaguchi, A. Tsujimatsu, H. Kumamoto et al., “Anxiolytic effects of yokukansan, a traditional Japanese medicine, via serotonin 5-HT1A receptors on anxiety-related behaviors in rats experienced aversive stress,” Journal of Ethnopharmacology, vol. 143, pp. 533–539, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  9. F. C. Kung, R. Ishii, H. C. Liu, and M. Takeda, “New possibility of traditional Chinese and Japanese medicine as treatment for behavioral and psychiatric symptoms in dementia,” Journal of Clinical Interventions in Aging, vol. 7, pp. 393–396, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  10. Y. Matsuda, T. Kishi, H. Shibayama, and N. Iwata, “Yokukansan in the treatment of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials,” Human Psychopharmacology, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 80–86, 2013. View at Google Scholar
  11. M. Yamaguchi, M. Deguchi, J. Wakasugi et al., “Hand-held monitor of sympathetic nervous system using salivary amylase activity and its validation by driver fatigue assessment,” Biosensors and Bioelectronics, vol. 21, no. 7, pp. 1007–1014, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. Y.-C. P. Arai, S. Sakakibara, A. Ito et al., “Intra-operative natural sound decreases salivary amylase activity of patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair under epidural anesthesia,” Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, vol. 52, no. 7, pp. 987–990, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. P. F. White, B. Tufanogullari, J. Taylor, and K. Klein, “The effect of pregabalin on preoperative anxiety and sedation levels: a dose-ranging study,” Anesthesia and Analgesia, vol. 108, no. 4, pp. 1140–1145, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. K. Bauerle, C.-A. Greim, M. Schroth, M. Geisselbrecht, A. Köbler, and N. Roewer, “Prediction of depth of sedation and anaesthesia by the Narcotrend EEG monitor,” British Journal of Anaesthesia, vol. 92, no. 6, pp. 841–845, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. B. L. Li, V. M. Yuen, X. R. Song et al., “Intranasal dexmedetomidine following failed chloral hydrate sedation in children,” Anaesthesia, vol. 69, no. 3, pp. 240–244, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  16. S. Yang and H. Lee, “A dose-finding study of preoperative intravenous dexmedetomidine in children's emergence delirium after epiblepharon surgery,” European Journal of Ophthalmology, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  17. Y. Ogawa, K.-I. Iwasaki, K. Aoki et al., “The different effects of midazolam and propofol sedation on dynamic cerebral autoregulation,” Anesthesia and Analgesia, vol. 111, no. 5, pp. 1279–1284, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus