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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015, Article ID 152086, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/152086
Research Article

Is Skin-Touch Sham Needle Not Placebo? A Double-Blind Crossover Study on Pain Alleviation

1Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Ariake University of Medical and Health Sciences, 2-9-1 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0063, Japan
2Department of Physiology, Showa University School of Medicine, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 142-8555, Japan
3Japan School of Acupuncture, Moxibustion and Physiotherapy, 20-1 Sakuragaokacho, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0031, Japan
4The Foundation for Oriental Medicine Research, 28-9 Sakuragaokacho, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0031, Japan

Received 8 January 2015; Revised 12 April 2015; Accepted 14 April 2015

Academic Editor: Lisa A. Conboy

Copyright © 2015 Miho Takayama et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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