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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 158012, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/158012
Research Article

The Study of Dynamic Characteristic of Acupoints Based on the Primary Dysmenorrhea Patients with the Tenderness Reflection on Diji (SP 8)

1Acupuncture and Moxibustion Department, Dongzhimen Hospital, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, No. 5 Haiyuncang, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100010, China
2College of Acupuncture-Moxibustion and Tuina, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, No. 13 of the North 3rd East Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100029, China
3International Medical Center, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, No. 2 Yinghua East Street, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100029, China

Received 19 December 2014; Revised 3 March 2015; Accepted 3 March 2015

Academic Editor: Haifa Qiao

Copyright © 2015 Sheng Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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