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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 247357, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/247357
Research Article

Aqueous Date Flesh or Pits Extract Attenuates Liver Fibrosis via Suppression of Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation and Reduction of Inflammatory Cytokines, Transforming Growth Factor-β1 and Angiogenic Markers in Carbon Tetrachloride-Intoxicated Rats

1Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11495, Saudi Arabia
2Biochemistry Department, College of Pharmacy, Mansoura University, Mansoura 35516, Egypt
3Anatomy Department, Faculty of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh 11495, Saudi Arabia

Received 8 November 2014; Revised 11 March 2015; Accepted 12 March 2015

Academic Editor: Gaofeng Liu

Copyright © 2015 Nouf M. Al-Rasheed et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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