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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015, Article ID 270876, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/270876
Research Article

A Randomized Controlled Trial for the Effectiveness of Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Guided Imagery as Anxiety Reducing Interventions in Breast and Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy

1Cyprus University of Technology, 15 Vragadinou Street, 3041 Limassol, Cyprus
2University of Athens, 123 Papadiamantopoulou Street, 115 27 Athens, Greece
3Improvast, 7 Arkadias Street, Office 206, 2020 Nicosia, Cyprus

Received 16 February 2015; Revised 11 June 2015; Accepted 22 July 2015

Academic Editor: Christopher G. Lis

Copyright © 2015 Andreas Charalambous et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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