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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 287847, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/287847
Review Article

Fishing for Nature’s Hits: Establishment of the Zebrafish as a Model for Screening Antidiabetic Natural Products

1New Drug Targets Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712, Republic of Korea
2Department of Endocrinology, Yanji Hospital, Jilin 133000, China

Received 31 August 2015; Accepted 28 October 2015

Academic Editor: Attila Hunyadi

Copyright © 2015 Nadia Tabassum et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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