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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 328196, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/328196
Review Article

Acupuncture for Low Back Pain: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

1Centre for Health, Activity and Rehabilitation Research, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, 325 Great King Street, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
2Centre for Health and Rehabilitation Technologies, Institute of Nursing and Health Research, School of Health Sciences, University of Ulster, Shore Road, Newtownabbey, County Antrim BT37 0QB, UK

Received 23 September 2014; Revised 21 January 2015; Accepted 22 January 2015

Academic Editor: Veronique Seidel

Copyright © 2015 Lizhou Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. As evidence of the effectiveness of acupuncture for low back pain (LBP) is inconsistent, we aimed to critically appraise the evidence from relevant systematic reviews. Methods. Systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) concerning acupuncture and LBP were searched in seven databases. Internal validity and external validity of systematic reviews were assessed. Systematic reviews were categorized and high quality reviews assigned greater weightings. Conclusions were generated from a narrative synthesis of the outcomes of subgroup comparisons. Results. Sixteen systematic reviews were appraised. Overall, the methodological quality was low and external validity weak. For acute LBP, evidence that acupuncture has a more favorable effect than sham acupuncture in relieving pain was inconsistent; it had a similar effect on improving function. For chronic LBP, evidence consistently demonstrated that acupuncture provides short-term clinically relevant benefits for pain relief and functional improvement compared with no treatment or acupuncture plus another conventional intervention. Conclusion. Systematic reviews of variable quality showed that acupuncture, either used in isolation or as an adjunct to conventional therapy, provides short-term improvements in pain and function for chronic LBP. More efforts are needed to improve both internal and external validity of systematic reviews and RCTs in this area.