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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015, Article ID 345835, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/345835
Review Article

Are There Benefits from Teaching Yoga at Schools? A Systematic Review of Randomized Control Trials of Yoga-Based Interventions

1Department of Physiology, Laboratory of Neurophysiology, Federal University of Sergipe (UFS), Avenida Marechal Rondon, s/n, Jardim Rosa Elze, São Cristóvão, 49100-000 Aracaju, SE, Brazil
2Department of Psychology, FASE\UNESA, Aracaju, SE, Brazil
3Trika Research Center, Loei, Thailand
4Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, Brazil
5Department of Psychobiology, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
6Indian Council of Medical Research Center for Advanced Research in Yoga and Patanjali Research Foundation, Bengaluru, India

Received 1 March 2015; Revised 21 June 2015; Accepted 25 June 2015

Academic Editor: Vernon A. Barnes

Copyright © 2015 C. Ferreira-Vorkapic et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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