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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 410979, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/410979
Review Article

Classic and Modern Meridian Studies: A Review of Low Hydraulic Resistance Channels along Meridians and Their Relevance for Therapeutic Effects in Traditional Chinese Medicine

1Institute of Acupuncture & Moxibustion, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100700, China
2Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, 17177 Stockholm, Sweden

Received 23 September 2014; Accepted 10 December 2014

Academic Editor: Waris Qidwai

Copyright © 2015 Wei-Bo Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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