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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 520454, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/520454
Research Article

Antinociceptive Effects of Spinal Manipulative Therapy on Nociceptive Behavior of Adult Rats during the Formalin Test

Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research, Palmer College of Chiropractic, 741 Brady Street, Davenport, IA 52803-5214, USA

Received 23 June 2015; Revised 26 October 2015; Accepted 9 November 2015

Academic Editor: Lise Hestbaek

Copyright © 2015 Stephen M. Onifer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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