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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015, Article ID 578972, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/578972
Research Article

Comparison of Body, Auricular, and Abdominal Acupuncture Treatments for Insomnia Differentiated as Internal Harassment of Phlegm-Heat Syndrome: An Orthogonal Design

1Institution of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100700, China
2TCM Hospital of Mentougou District, Beijing 102300, China
3Medical College of Xiamen University, Xiamen 361000, China

Received 25 August 2015; Revised 23 October 2015; Accepted 25 October 2015

Academic Editor: Gerhard Litscher

Copyright © 2015 Yue Jiao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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