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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015, Article ID 765705, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/765705
Research Article

Sea Buckthorn Leaf Extract Protects Jejunum and Bone Marrow of 60Cobalt-Gamma-Irradiated Mice by Regulating Apoptosis and Tissue Regeneration

1Department of Radiation Biology, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, Brig SK Mazumdar Marg, Delhi 110054, India
2Centre for Transgenic Plant Development, Department of Biotechnology, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi 110062, India

Received 19 March 2015; Accepted 27 July 2015

Academic Editor: Jae Youl Cho

Copyright © 2015 Madhu Bala et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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