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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015, Article ID 871327, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/871327
Review Article

Eye Acupuncture Treatment for Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

1Liaoning University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 79 Chongshan East Road, Huanggu District, Shenyang 110847, China
2Department of Alternative Medicine, Nambu University, Kwangju 506-824, Republic of Korea
3Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Liaoning Cancer Hospital & Institute, Shenyang 110042, China
4Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044, China
5Yangxin People Hospital, Binzhou 251800, China
6Benxi City Hospital for Infectious Diseases, Benxi 117022, China

Received 17 December 2014; Revised 2 May 2015; Accepted 5 May 2015

Academic Editor: Haifa Qiao

Copyright © 2015 Zeng-Hua Bai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

There were applications of eye acupuncture for stroke patients. Unfortunately, similar to many other Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) treatments, it lacks comprehensive evaluation and system review for its effect and safety. Objective. This study is a systematic review to appraise the safety and effectiveness of eye acupuncture for stroke. Methods. “Eye acupuncture therapy” in eleven databases was searched by randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized controlled trials. The search activity was ended in April 2014. The data were extracted and assessed by three independent authors. Rev Man 5.0 software was used for data analysis with effect estimate presented as relative risk (RR) and mean difference (MD) with a 95% confidence interval. Results. Sixteen trials (1120 patients) were involved with generally poor methodological quality. The study indicated that when eye acupuncture was combined with western medicine compared to western medicine, there was a significant difference in the areas of mental state, swallow function, and NDS. When eye acupuncture was combined with western medicine and rehabilitation compared to western medicine and rehabilitation, there was significant difference in the changes of SSS, FMA, and constipation symptoms evaluation. No adverse events or side effects have been reported. Conclusions. The current evidence is insufficient and the rigorously designed trials are warranted.