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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 915927, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/915927
Research Article

Central Antinociceptive and Mechanism of Action of Pereskia bleo Kunth Leaves Crude Extract, Fractions, and Isolated Compounds

1Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Institute of Biomedical Science, Avenida Carlos Chagas Filho 373, CCS Building, 21941-902 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
2Faculty of Agro Industry and Natural Resources, Universiti Malaysia Kelantan, 15400 Kota Bharu, Kelantan, Malaysia
3School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences and Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland

Received 23 December 2014; Revised 26 May 2015; Accepted 25 June 2015

Academic Editor: Jian Kong

Copyright © 2015 Carolina Carvalho Guilhon et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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