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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2016, Article ID 1654056, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1654056
Research Article

The In Vitro and In Vivo Wound Healing Properties of the Chinese Herbal Medicine “Jinchuang Ointment”

1Division of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University Beigang Hospital, Yulin 65152, Taiwan
2Division of Chinese Medicine, An Nan Hospital, China Medical University, Tainan 70965, Taiwan
3College of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40421, Taiwan
4Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Tzu Chi University, Hualien 97004, Taiwan
5Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Tzu Chi University, Hualien 97004, Taiwan
6Department of Plastic Surgery, China Medical University Beigang Hospital, Yulin 65152, Taiwan
7School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40421, Taiwan
8Department of Plastic Surgery, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 40447, Taiwan
9Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, Tzu Chi University, Hualien 97004, Taiwan
10Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung 40447, Taiwan
11Graduate Institute of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40421, Taiwan

Received 18 January 2016; Accepted 10 March 2016

Academic Editor: Yoshiji Ohta

Copyright © 2016 Tsung-Jung Ho et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

“Jinchuang ointment” is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine complex for treatment of incised wounds. For more than ten years, it has been used at China Medical University Hospital (Taichung, Taiwan) for the treatment of diabetic foot infections and decubitus ulcers. Three different cases are presented in this study. “Jinchuang” ointment is a mixture of natural product complexes from nine different components, making it difficult to analyze its exact chemical compositions. To further characterize the herbal ingredients used in this study, the contents of reference standards present in a subset of the ointment ingredients (dragon’s blood, catechu, frankincense, and myrrh) were determined by HPLC. Two in vitro cell based assay platforms, wound healing and tube formation, were used to examine the biological activity of this medicine. Our results show that this herbal medicine possesses strong activities including stimulation of angiogenesis, cell proliferation, and cell migration, which provide the scientific basis for its clinically observed curative effects on nonhealing diabetic wounds.