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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 2156969, 6 pages
Review Article

Self-Administered Mind-Body Practices for Reducing Health Disparities: An Interprofessional Opinion and Call to Action

1Virginia Commonwealth University School of Nursing, Richmond, VA, USA
2Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, Division of Epidemiology, Virginia Commonwealth School of Medicine, Richmond, VA, USA

Received 23 March 2016; Accepted 22 August 2016

Academic Editor: Florian Pfab

Copyright © 2016 Patricia A. Kinser et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Health disparities (HD) continue to persist in the United States which underscores the importance of using low-cost, accessible, evidence-based strategies that can improve health outcomes, especially for chronic conditions that are prevalent among underserved minority populations. Complementary/integrative health modalities, particularly self-administered mind-body practices (MBP), can be extremely useful in reducing HD because they are intrinsically patient-centered and they empower patients to actively engage in self-care of health and self-management of symptoms. Interprofessional healthcare providers and patients can engage in powerful partnerships that encompass self-administered MBP to improve health. This is a call to action for interprofessional researchers to engage in high-quality research regarding efficacy and cost-effectiveness of self-administered MBP, for practitioners to engage patients in self-administered MBP for health promotion, disease prevention, and symptom management, and for healthcare institutions to integrate self-administered MBP into conventional health practices to reduce HD in their communities.