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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 2680409, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2680409
Review Article

The Therapeutic Potential of Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) Diterpenes for Alzheimer’s Disease

Pharmacognosy Research Laboratories & Herbal Analysis Services UK, Chatham-Maritime, Kent ME4 4TB, UK

Received 18 October 2015; Accepted 28 December 2015

Academic Editor: Ki-Wan Oh

Copyright © 2016 Solomon Habtemariam. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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