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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2016, Article ID 3198249, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3198249
Research Article

Transcriptomics Analysis of Candida albicans Treated with Huanglian Jiedu Decoction Using RNA-seq

1Zhejiang Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, 54 Youdian Road, Hangzhou 310006, China
2College of Agronomy and Plant Protection, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao 266109, China
3Shandong Provincial Research Center for Bioinformatic Engineering and Technique, School of Life Sciences, Shandong University of Technology, 266 West Cunxi Road, Zibo 255049, China

Received 13 November 2015; Accepted 21 March 2016

Academic Editor: Letizia Angiolella

Copyright © 2016 Qianqian Yang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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