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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 3948795, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3948795
Research Article

Effects of Safflower Yellow on the Treatment of Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

1Department of Anesthesiology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China
2Department of Intensive Care Unit, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China
3Department of Respiratory Medicine, The People’s Hospital of Pujiang County, Sichuan 611630, China
4Department of Nephrology, The People’s Hospital of Pujiang County, Sichuan 611630, China

Received 12 November 2015; Revised 11 January 2016; Accepted 21 January 2016

Academic Editor: Seung-Il Jeong

Copyright © 2016 Xiao-jin Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. To evaluate the clinical effect of safflower yellow on the treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock. Methods. 85 patients with severe sepsis and septic shock were randomly selected to receive either therapy according to the international guidelines for management of severe sepsis and septic shock (Surviving Sepsis Campaign 2012) (control group, n = 45) or conventional therapy plus safflower yellow (study group, n = 40). The 28-day mortality and 28-day Kaplan-Meier survival curves were compared as primary outcomes. Results. The 28-day mortality from all causes and in-hospital mortality were significantly lower in the study group (50%, 17.5%) as compared to the control group (78.58%, 54.76%) (P = 0.007, all causes, P < 0.001, in-hospital), and the 28-day Kaplan-Meier survival curve was higher in the study group than in the control group (P = 0.008, all causes, P < 0.001, in-hospital, Log Rank). 72 hours after treatment, secondary outcomes including heart rate, leukocyte counts, lactate levels, and platelet counts of patients in the study group were ameliorated significantly as compared with the control group. Conclusion. This study offers a potential new strategy employing safflower yellow to more effectively treat patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. This trial is registered with identifier ChiCTR-TRC-14005196.