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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 4173185, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4173185
Research Article

Ipsilateral Putamen and Insula Activation by Both Left and Right GB34 Acupuncture Stimulation: An fMRI Study on Healthy Participants

1College of Korean Medicine, Sang Ji University, Wonju 26339, Republic of Korea
2Department of Meridian & Acupoint, College of Korean Medicine, WHO Collaborating Center for Traditional Medicine, East-West Medical Research Institute, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea
3Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen, 6525 HR Nijmegen, Netherlands

Received 2 June 2016; Revised 25 September 2016; Accepted 15 November 2016

Academic Editor: Ching-Liang Hsieh

Copyright © 2016 Sujung Yeo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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