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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 4391375, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4391375
Review Article

Establishing Natural Nootropics: Recent Molecular Enhancement Influenced by Natural Nootropic

1Department of Human Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Malaysia
2Atta-ur-Rahman Institute for Natural Product Discovery, Aras 9 Bangunan FF3, UiTM Puncak Alam, Bandar Baru Puncak Alam, 42300 Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia

Received 31 May 2016; Accepted 18 July 2016

Academic Editor: Manel Santafe

Copyright © 2016 Noor Azuin Suliman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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