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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 7893710, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7893710
Research Article

Electroacupuncture Ameliorates Learning and Memory and Improves Synaptic Plasticity via Activation of the PKA/CREB Signaling Pathway in Cerebral Hypoperfusion

1Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei Province, China
2Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Xiangyang Central Hospital, Hubei College of Arts and Science, Xiangyang, Hubei Province, China
3College of Health Science, Wuhan Institute of Physical Education, Wuhan, Hubei Province, China

Received 2 June 2016; Accepted 18 September 2016

Academic Editor: Yiu W. Kwan

Copyright © 2016 Cai-Xia Zheng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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