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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 7898093, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7898093
Research Article

The Relieving Effects of BrainPower Advanced, a Dietary Supplement, in Older Adults with Subjective Memory Complaints: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

1Department of Community Health and Family Medicine, School of Public Health, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200025, China
2School of Public Health, Shanghai University of TCM, Shanghai 201203, China
3Si-Tang Community Health Service Center of Shanghai, Shanghai 200431, China
4Department of Emergency Medicine, Xin Hua Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092, China
5Southern California Kaiser Sunset, 4867 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90027, USA
6Department of Research, DRM Resources, 1683 Sunflower Avenue, Costa Mesa, CA 92626, USA
7Maryland Population Research Center, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA
8Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
9Imaging Institute of Rehabilitation and Development of Brain Function, North Sichuan Medical University, Nanchong Central Hospital, Nanchong 637000, China
10Lotus Biotech.com LLC, John Hopkins University-MCC, 9601 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD 20850, USA

Received 18 December 2015; Revised 27 February 2016; Accepted 29 February 2016

Academic Editor: Jairo Kennup Bastos

Copyright © 2016 Jingfen Zhu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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