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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2016, Article ID 8010891, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8010891
Research Article

How Do Patients with Chronic Neck Pain Experience the Effects of Qigong and Exercise Therapy? A Qualitative Interview Study

1Institute of Public Health, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Seestrasse 73, 13347 Berlin, Germany
2Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Economics, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, 10098 Berlin, Germany
3Institute for Complementary and Integrative Medicine, University of Zurich and UniversityHospital Zurich, Rämistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich, Switzerland

Received 9 December 2015; Revised 13 May 2016; Accepted 22 May 2016

Academic Editor: Maruti Ram Gudavalli

Copyright © 2016 Christine Holmberg et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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