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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017, Article ID 1739740, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1739740
Research Article

The Use of Herbal Remedies among Mothers of Young Children Living in the Central Appalachian Region

1Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
2Department of Pharmaceutical Systems and Policy, School of Pharmacy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA
3Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Kimberly M. Kelly; ude.uvw.csh@yllekmk

Received 27 May 2017; Revised 29 August 2017; Accepted 13 September 2017; Published 2 November 2017

Academic Editor: Fabio Firenzuoli

Copyright © 2017 Monira Alwhaibi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Introduction. Women often use herbal remedies as a complement or alternative to traditional medicine. Guided by the Comprehensive Model of Information Seeking, this study examined use of herbal remedies among mothers of young children living in the Central Appalachian Region. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted among mothers of young children (). The outcome measure of interest was the use of any herbal remedy in the past six months. Two scales were developed to measure information seeking channels and to measure beliefs about the safety/efficacy of herbal remedies. Results. One-third reported using herbal remedies in the past six months, with fenugreek being the most common. Most reported using herbal remedies to increase breast milk production and to relieve cold/flu-like symptoms. Women scoring highest in information seeking channels were three times as likely to use herbal remedies. Women scoring highest in the beliefs about the safety/efficacy of herbal remedies were four times as likely to use herbal remedies. Conclusion. Herbal remedies are commonly used among women living in the Central Appalachian Region, a region with lower education and income level. Therefore, public health interventions about the types, safety, and efficacy of herbal remedies may improve health within this population.