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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017, Article ID 2357653, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2357653
Research Article

The Role of MAPK and Dopaminergic Synapse Signaling Pathways in Antidepressant Effect of Electroacupuncture Pretreatment in Chronic Restraint Stress Rats

1School of Acupuncture-Moxibustion and Tuina, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100029, China
2School of Chinese Integrative Medicine, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang 050091, China
3Centre for Evidence-Based Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100029, China
4School of Psychological and Cognitive Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Tuya Bao; ten.362@bayut

Received 4 May 2017; Revised 17 July 2017; Accepted 3 August 2017; Published 17 October 2017

Academic Editor: Gang Chen

Copyright © 2017 Xinjing Yang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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