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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 3574012, 27 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3574012
Review Article

Plants-Derived Neuroprotective Agents: Cutting the Cycle of Cell Death through Multiple Mechanisms

1Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
2Pharmacognosy Research Laboratories and Herbal Analysis Services, University of Greenwich, Chatham-Maritime, Kent ME4 4TB, UK

Correspondence should be addressed to Solomon Habtemariam

Received 9 June 2017; Revised 14 July 2017; Accepted 18 July 2017; Published 22 August 2017

Academic Editor: Olumayokun A. Olajide

Copyright © 2017 Taiwo Olayemi Elufioye et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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