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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017, Article ID 4365429, 19 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4365429
Review Article

Epigenetic Mechanisms of Integrative Medicine

1Epigenetics Laboratory, Department of Anatomy, Howard University, 520 W St. NW, Washington, DC 20059, USA
2Vision Genomics, LLC, 5725 North Capitol St. NE, Washington, DC 20011, USA
3Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive-0628, San Diego, CA 92093, USA
4The Chopra Foundation, 2013 Costa Del Mar, Carlsbad, CA 92009, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Antonei B. Csoka; ude.drawoh@akosc.ienotna

Received 12 July 2016; Revised 13 November 2016; Accepted 15 January 2017; Published 21 February 2017

Academic Editor: Lisa A. Conboy

Copyright © 2017 Riya R. Kanherkar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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