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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017, Article ID 4373182, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4373182
Research Article

Analgesic Effect of Moxibustion with Different Temperature on Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain Mice: A Comparative Study

1Acupuncture and Tuina School, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, Sichuan 610075, China
2Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, People’s Hospital of Deyang City, Deyang, Sichuan 618000, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Haiyan Yin; nc.ude.mctudc@66026002 and Shuguang Yu; nc.ude.mctudc@gsy

Received 6 February 2017; Revised 1 May 2017; Accepted 21 August 2017; Published 9 October 2017

Academic Editor: Chang G. Son

Copyright © 2017 Wei Zhou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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