Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 5034827, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5034827
Research Article

In Vivo and In Vitro Evaluation of Pharmacological Potentials of Secondary Bioactive Metabolites of Dalbergia candenatensis Leaves

Pharmacy Discipline, Life Science School, Khulna University, Khulna 9208, Bangladesh

Correspondence should be addressed to Md. Anisuzzman; moc.liamg@4891namzzusina

Received 18 June 2017; Revised 9 September 2017; Accepted 25 October 2017; Published 26 December 2017

Academic Editor: Laura De Martino

Copyright © 2017 Md. Anisuzzman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. A. De Pasquale, “Pharmacognosy: The oldest modern science,” Journal of Ethnopharmacology, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 1–16, 1984. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. D. S. Fabricant and N. R. Farnsworth, “The value of plants used in traditional medicine for drug discovery,” Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 109, no. 1, pp. 69–75, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. P. R. Dash, “Phytochemical Screening and Pharmacological Investigations on Hedychium coronarium,” 2016.
  4. I. Faridah-Hanum, A. Latiff, K. R. Hakeem, and M. Ozturk, Mangrove Ecosystems of Asia: Status, Challenges and Management Strategies, Springer, 2013.
  5. S. Saha, J. A. Shilpi, H. Mondal et al., “Ethnomedicinal, phytochemical, and pharmacological profile of the genus Dalbergia L.(Fabaceae),” Phytopharmacology, vol. 4, no. 2, 2013. View at Google Scholar
  6. S. Cheenpracha, C. Karalai, C. Ponglimanont, and A. Kanjana-Opas, “Candenatenins A-F, phenolic compounds from the heartwood of Dalbergia candenatensis,” Journal of Natural Products, vol. 72, no. 8, pp. 1395–1398, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. M. O. Hamburger, G. A. Cordell, P. Tantivatana, and N. Ruangrungsi, “Traditional medicinal plants of Thailand, VIII. Isoflavonoids of Dalbergia candenatensis,” Journal of Natural Products, vol. 50, no. 4, pp. 696–699, 1987. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. A. El-Halawany, R. Salah El Dine, M. H. Chung, T. Nishihara, and M. Hattori, “Screening for estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities of plants growing in Egypt and Thailand,” Pharmacognosy Research, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 107–113, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. A. Ghani, Medicinal plants of Bangladesh: chemical constituents and uses, Asiatic society of Bangladesh, 1998.
  10. O. Oyedapo and A. J. Famurewa, “Antiprotease and Membrane Stabilizing Activities of Extracts of Fagara Zanthoxyloides, Olax Subscorpioides and Tetrapleura Tetraptera,” International Journal of Pharmacognosy, vol. 33, no. 1, pp. 65–69, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  11. U. A. Shinde, A. S. Phadke, A. M. Nair, A. A. Mungantiwar, V. J. Dikshit, and M. N. Saraf, “Membrane stabilizing activity - A possible mechanism of action for the anti-inflammatory activity of Cedrus deodara wood oil,” Fitoterapia, vol. 70, no. 3, pp. 251–257, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. O. Omodamiro and C. Ikekamma, “In vitro Study of Antioxidant and Anticoagulant Activities of Ethanol Extract of Pandanus tectorius Leaves,” International Blood Research Reviews, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 1–11, 2016. View at Google Scholar
  13. J. El Hilaly, Z. H. Israili, and B. Lyoussi, “Acute and chronic toxicological studies of Ajuga iva in experimental animals,” Journal of Ethnopharmacology, vol. 91, no. 1, pp. 43–50, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. OECD, Acute Oral Toxicity – Acute Toxic Class Method 423 Adopted, Guideline for Testing of Chemicals, 2001, 1–14.
  15. N. N. Biswas, S. Saha, and M. K. Ali, “Antioxidant, antimicrobial, cytotoxic and analgesic activities of ethanolic extract of Mentha arvensis L,” Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine, vol. 4, no. 10, pp. 792–797, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. B. N. Meyer, N. R. Ferrigni, J. E. Putnam, L. B. Jacobsen, D. E. Nichols, and J. L. McLaughlin, “Brine shrimp: a convenient general bioassay for active plant constituents,” Planta Medica, vol. 45, no. 5, pp. 31–34, 1982. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  17. C. A. Winter, E. A. Risley, and G. W. Nuss, “Carrageenin-induced edema in hind paw of the rat as an assay for antiiflammatory drugs,” Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, vol. 3, pp. 544–547, 1962. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. N. Dehar and R. Walia, “Potentiation of thiopentone sodium induced hypnosis by Berberis aristata in rodents,” Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 131–133, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  19. “Central nervous system depressant activity of Diospyros peregrina bark,” Oriental Pharmacy and Experimental Medicine, vol. 4, no. 4, pp. 249–252, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  20. B. Y. Sheikh, S. M. N. K. Zihad, N. Sifat et al., “Comparative study of neuropharmacological, analgesic properties and phenolic profile of Ajwah, Safawy and Sukkari cultivars of date palm (Phoenix dactylifera),” Oriental Pharmacy and Experimental Medicine, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 175–183, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. S. J. Uddin, J. A. Shilpi, M. T. Rahman, M. Ferdous, R. Rouf, and S. D. Sarker, “Assessment of neuropharmacological activities of Pandanus foetidus (Pandanaceae) in mice,” Die Pharmazie-An International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, vol. 61, no. 4, pp. 362–364, 2006. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. M. Anisuzzaman, M. Q. Ahsan, M. R. Kuddus, and M. A. Rashid, “Pharmacological Activities of Senna obtusifolia Linn.: A Medicinal Plant of Bangladesh,” Bangladesh Pharmaceutical Journal, vol. 17, no. 2, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  23. H. Sies, T. Schewe, C. Heiss, and M. Kelm, “Cocoa polyphenols and inflammatory mediators.,” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 81, no. 1, 2005. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. A. T. Oladiji, T. O. Jacob, and M. T. Yakubu, “Anti-anaemic potentials of aqueous extract of Sorghum bicolor (L.) moench stem bark in rats,” Journal of Ethnopharmacology, vol. 111, no. 3, pp. 651–656, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. W. Lee, E.-J. Yang, S.-K. Ku, K.-S. Song, and J.-S. Bae, “Anticoagulant activities of oleanolic acid via inhibition of tissue factor expressions,” BMB Reports, vol. 45, no. 7, pp. 390–395, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. W. Blonski, T. Siropaides, and K. R. Reddy, “Coagulopathy in liver disease,” Current Treatment Options in Gastroenterology, vol. 10, no. 6, pp. 464–473, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. H. H. Kashani, E. S. Hoseini, H. Nikzad, and M. H. Aarabi, “Pharmacological properties of medicinal herbs by focus on secondary metabolites,” Life Science Journal, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 509–520, 2012. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. M. B. Engler and M. M. Engler, “The vasculoprotective effects of flavonoid-rich cocoa and chocolate,” Nutrition Research, vol. 24, no. 9, pp. 695–706, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. “Antinociceptive activity of some Bangladeshi medicinal plant extracts,” Oriental Pharmacy and Experimental Medicine, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 96–101, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  30. C. Talukder, S. Saha, S. Adhikari, H. K. Mondal, M. Khirul Islam, and M. Anisuzzman, “Evaluation of antioxidant, analgesic and antidiarrhoeal activity of Flacourtia jangomas (Lour.) Raeusch. leaves,” Pharmacologyonline, vol. 3, pp. 20–28, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. R. Arslan, N. Bektas, and Y. Ozturk, “Antinociceptive activity of methanol extract of fruits of Capparis ovata in mice,” Journal of Ethnopharmacology, vol. 131, no. 1, pp. 28–32, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. D. D. Orhan, A. Hartevioğlu, E. Küpeli, and E. Yesilada, “In vivo anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activity of the crude extract and fractions from Rosa canina L. fruits,” Journal of Ethnopharmacology, vol. 112, no. 2, pp. 394–400, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. “Antioxidant, antinociceptive activity and general toxicity study of Dendrophthoe falcata and isolation of quercitrin as the major component,” Oriental Pharmacy and Experimental Medicine, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 355–360, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  34. S. Dusen, C. Aydin, H. Y. Gul, C. Ozay, O. Dusen, and R. Mammadov, “In vitro cytotoxic activities ofCyclamen L.(Primulaceae) ethanol extracts from Turkey,” Fresenius Environmental Bulletin, vol. 25, no. 12 A, pp. 6224–6228, 2016. View at Google Scholar
  35. R. L. Fabri, D. S. De Sá, A. P. O. Pereira, E. Scio, D. S. Pimenta, and L. M. Chedier, “Antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxicity potential of Manihot multifida (L.) Crantz (Euphorbiaceae),” Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências, vol. 87, no. 1, pp. 303–311, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. A. A. Musa, “Cytotoxicity activity and phytochemical screening of Cochlospermum tinctorium perr ex A. Rich rhizome,” Journal of Applied Pharmaceutical Science, vol. 2, no. 7, pp. 155–159, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. R. A. Greenwald, “Animal models for evaluation of arthritis drugs,” Methods and Findings in Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 75–83, 1991. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. A. Tjølsen, O.-G. Berge, S. Hunskaar, J. H. Rosland, and K. Hole, “The formalin test: an evaluation of the method,” PAIN, vol. 51, no. 1, pp. 5–17, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. H. P. Kim, K. H. Son, H. W. Chang, and S. S. Kang, “Anti-inflammatory plant flavonoids and cellular action mechanisms,” Journal of Pharmacological Sciences, vol. 96, no. 3, pp. 229–245, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. S. Perrot, G. Guilbaud, and V. Kayser, “Effects of intraplantar morphine on paw edema and pain-related behaviour in a rat model of repeated acute inflammation,” PAIN, vol. 83, no. 2, pp. 249–257, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. S. Fernández, C. Wasowski, A. C. Paladini, and M. Marder, “Sedative and sleep-enhancing properties of linarin, a flavonoid-isolated from Valeriana officinalis,” Pharmacology Biochemistry & Behavior, vol. 77, no. 2, pp. 399–404, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. P. Kahnberg, E. Lager, C. Rosenberg et al., “Refinement and evaluation of a pharmacophore model for flavone derivatives binding to the benzodiazepine site of the GABAA receptor,” Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, vol. 45, no. 19, pp. 4188–4201, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. E. Trofimiuk, A. Walesiuk, and J. J. Braszko, “St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) diminishes cognitive impairment caused by the chronic restraint stress in rats,” Pharmacological Research, vol. 51, no. 3, pp. 239–246, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. R. Awad, F. Ahmed, N. Bourbonnais-Spear et al., “Ethnopharmacology of Q'eqchi' Maya antiepileptic and anxiolytic plants: effects on the GABAergic system,” Journal of Ethnopharmacology, vol. 125, no. 2, pp. 257–264, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  45. R. Estrada-Reyes, C. López-Rubalcava, L. Rocha, G. Heinze, A. R. González Esquinca, and M. Martínez-Vázquez, “Anxiolytic-like and sedative actions of Rollinia mucosa: possible involvement of the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex,” Pharmaceutical Biology, vol. 48, no. 1, pp. 70–75, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. R. N. Takahashi, T. C. M. De Lima, and G. S. Morato, “Pharmacological actions of tannic acid; II. Evaluation of CNS activity in animals,” Planta Medica, vol. 4, pp. 272–275, 1986. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  47. M. Moniruzzaman, M. Atikur Rahman, and A. Ferdous, “Evaluation of sedative and hypnotic activity of ethanolic extract of Scoparia dulcis Linn.,” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 2015, Article ID 873954, 6 pages, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  48. H. Takeda, M. Tsuji, and T. Matsumiya, “Changes in head-dipping behavior in the hole-board test reflect the anxiogenic and/or anxiolytic state in mice,” European Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 350, no. 1, pp. 21–29, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  49. S. E. File and S. Pellow, “Intrinsic actions of the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, Ro 15-1788,” Psychopharmacology, vol. 88, no. 1, pp. 1–11, 1986. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  50. H. Viola, C. Wasowski, M. L. De Stein et al., “Apigenin, a component of Matricaria recutita flowers, is a central benzodiazepine receptors-ligand with anxiolytic effects,” Planta Medica, vol. 61, no. 3, pp. 213–216, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus