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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017, Article ID 5439645, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5439645
Research Article

The Antidiabetic Activity of Nigella sativa and Propolis on Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes and Diabetic Nephropathy in Male Rats

1Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
2Bioinformatics Department, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Institute, University of Sadat City, Sadat City, Monufia, Egypt

Correspondence should be addressed to Haddad A. El Rabey; moc.liamtoh@yebarle

Received 3 July 2016; Accepted 19 January 2017; Published 16 February 2017

Academic Editor: Andrzej K. Kuropatnicki

Copyright © 2017 Haddad A. El Rabey et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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