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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017, Article ID 6746071, 34 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6746071
Review Article

Lippia javanica (Burm.f.) Spreng.: Traditional and Commercial Uses and Phytochemical and Pharmacological Significance in the African and Indian Subcontinent

Department of Botany, University of Fort Hare, Private Bag X1314, Alice 5700, South Africa

Correspondence should be addressed to Alfred Maroyi; az.ca.hfu@iyorama

Received 5 September 2016; Revised 25 October 2016; Accepted 20 November 2016; Published 1 January 2017

Academic Editor: Rainer W. Bussmann

Copyright © 2017 Alfred Maroyi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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