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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017, Article ID 7247016, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7247016
Research Article

Antiproliferative and Antibacterial Activities of Cirsium scabrum from Tunisia

1Institut Charles Viollette (EA 7394), Université de Lille, 59000 Lille, France
2The Laboratory of Aromatic and Medicinal Plants, Biotechnology Centre of Borj-Cédria (CBBC), Hammam-lif, Tunisia
3Pharmacognosy Research Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Université Catholique de Louvain, Avenue E. Mounier, No. 72, B01.72.03-1200 Brussels, Belgium
4UDSL, INSERM U995, UFR Pharmacie, 59000 Lille, France

Correspondence should be addressed to Céline Rivière; rf.2ellil-vinu@3-ereivir.enilec

Received 22 March 2017; Accepted 6 June 2017; Published 12 July 2017

Academic Editor: Ken Yasukawa

Copyright © 2017 Ramla Sahli et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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