Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 8218139, 22 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8218139
Review Article

Chuna (or Tuina) Manual Therapy for Musculoskeletal Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

1School of Korean Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan 50612, Republic of Korea
2Korean Medicine Clinical Research Center, Korean Medicine Hospital, Pusan National University, Yangsan 50612, Republic of Korea
3Department of Korean Rehabilitation Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 02447, Republic of Korea
4Jaseng Spine and Joint Research Institute, Jaseng Medical Foundation, Seoul 06017, Republic of Korea
5Clinical Research Division, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon 34054, Republic of Korea
6Korean Medicine Life Science, University of Science & Technology (UST), Campus of Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon 34054, Republic of Korea
7Division of Clinical Medicine, School of Korean Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan 50612, Republic of Korea
8Spine & Joint Center, Korean Medicine Hospital, Pusan National University, Yangsan 50612, Republic of Korea

Correspondence should be addressed to Byung-Cheul Shin

Received 9 September 2017; Accepted 27 November 2017; Published 26 December 2017

Academic Editor: Deborah A. Kennedy

Copyright © 2017 Nam-Woo Lee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. To review the literature and systematically evaluate the effectiveness of Chuna (or Tuina) manual therapy (C[T]MT) on pain and function for musculoskeletal disorders. Methods. We searched 15 English, Chinese, Japanese, and Korean databases using relevant keywords. All randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of C(T)MT for musculoskeletal disorders were considered, and we limited analyses to studies with a low-risk bias for randomization and/or allocation concealment. Results. Sixty-six RCTs with 6,170 participants were included. One sham-controlled RCT showed that C(T)MT relieved pain more effectively than a sham control (SMD 3.09 3.59, 2.59). For active-controlled RCTs, pooled meta-analysis showed that C(T)MT had statistically significant effects on pain reduction, especially compared to traction (), drugs (), and physical therapies (). For functional improvement, combined effects of C(T)MT with drugs () and traction () also showed similar positive effects. Conclusions. This systematic review suggests that C(T)MT is safe and effective for pain reduction and functional improvement for musculoskeletal diseases; however, the evidence for functional improvement was not as strong as for pain reduction. For future studies, high-quality RCTs such as sham-controlled studies with standardized interventions are needed to provide sufficient evidence on the effects of C(T)MT for musculoskeletal diseases. Protocol registration number is CRD42016038307 04/07/2016.