Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine / 2017 / Article / Tab 3

Review Article

Moxibustion in Early Chinese Medicine and Its Relation to the Origin of Meridians: A Study on the Unearthed Literatures

Table 3

The comparison between Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Internal Medicine, Cauterization Canon of the Eleven Vessels of the Foot and Forearm, and Cauterization Canon of the Eleven Yin and Yang Vessels.

Name of bookCauterization Canon of the Eleven Vessels of the Foot and ForearmCauterization Canon of the Eleven Yin and Yang VesselsThe Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Internal Medicine

NomenclatureFoot/hand Yin/Yang meridiansYin/Yang meridians or regional anatomy position meridians Affiliated viscus foot/hand Yin/Yang meridians

Writing form of a character of meridianMai” ()Mai” (脉)Jingmai” (经脉)

Direction of meridians circulationCentripetalShoulder meridian and hand Taiyin meridian: axofugal
Others: centripetal
Hand Yin meridian: thorax to hand
Hand Yang meridian: hand to head
Foot Yin meridian: feet to thorax
Foot Yang meridian: head to feet

Number of meridians111112

Relationship between meridiansNo correlationNo correlationJunction by head-tail in regular sequence

Amount of acupointsNoneNone160 points

Amount of diseases78Shidongbing: 60
Suoshengbing: 87
Shidongbing: 74
Suoshengbing: 143

Treatment for diseasesMoxibustionMoxibustionAcupuncture; moxibustion; decoction

Relations to viscera and bowelsOnly two meridians connected with viscera and bowelsOnly three meridians connected with viscera and bowels12 meridians all have their own affiliated viscera and bowels

We are committed to sharing findings related to COVID-19 as quickly as possible. We will be providing unlimited waivers of publication charges for accepted research articles as well as case reports and case series related to COVID-19. Review articles are excluded from this waiver policy. Sign up here as a reviewer to help fast-track new submissions.