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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 8753815, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8753815
Research Article

The Significant Pathways and Genes Underlying the Colon Cancer Treatment by the Traditional Chinese Medicine PHY906

1Research Center of TCM, The Affiliated Hospital of Changchun University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Changchun, China
2Digest Department, China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, China
3Digest Department, Heilongjiang Provincial Hospital, Heilongjiang, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Changyu Zhou

Received 21 February 2017; Accepted 6 April 2017; Published 15 May 2017

Academic Editor: Luciana Dini

Copyright © 2017 Ziyuan Su et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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