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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017, Article ID 9716586, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9716586
Research Article

Maintaining Treatment Fidelity of Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention Intervention for Alcohol Dependence: A Randomized Controlled Trial Experience

1School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1100 Delaplaine Ct., Madison, WI 53715, USA
2Mayo Clinic, Department of Medicine, Division of Internal Medicine, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
3UnityPoint Health Meriter, 202 S Park St, Madison, WI 53715, USA
4University Hospital and Clinics, 600 Highland Ave, Madison, WI 53792, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Aleksandra E. Zgierska; ude.csiw.demmaf@aksreigz.ardnaskela

Received 4 December 2016; Revised 29 March 2017; Accepted 14 May 2017; Published 5 July 2017

Academic Editor: Mark Moss

Copyright © 2017 Aleksandra E. Zgierska et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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